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Power Sources

Burbank’s Sources of Electricity 2014

In 2007, Burbank was the first city in the nation to commit to using 33% renewable energy by the year 2020. Over 25% of power used in Burbank comes from a renewable resource and BWP recently signed an agreement to reach 33% in the next few years.  As BWP increases the use of clean renewable resources, the use of coal decreases.

 

 

Where Does Burbank’s Power Come From?

BWP gets its electricity from a number of sources, using a wide variety of technologies and fuels, located in California, Arizona, Nevada, Washington, Wyoming, and Utah. Here are a few:

 

Copper Mountain Solar,
Nevada

The Copper Mountain solar project, currently under construction, will be a brand-new 250 megawatt solar photovoltaic power plant located near Boulder City, Nevada.  BWP signed a long-term power purchase contract to purchase 40 megawatts of energy for 20 years.   

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Milford Wind,
Utah

The Milford wind project began commercial operations in November 2009.  BWP has a long-term contract ending in 2027 to purchase 10 megawatts of capacity and energy. The project is comprised of 97 wind turbines, including 58 Clipper 2.5 megawatt wind turbines and 39 General Electric 1.5 megawatt wind turbines, spread over about 16,000 acres.  Together with its sister project, Milford 2, the site is the largest operating wind farm in Utah at 306 megawatts in total.

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Don Campbell,
Nevada

The Don Campbell geothermal project, a brand-new 25 megawatt geothermal power plant, is located in western Nevada.  Geothermal is a renewable energy technology that uses the earth’s heat to produce steam, which then drives a steam turbine-generator to produce electricity. In contrast to most renewable energy technologies – like wind and solar – geothermal is not intermittent; it is designed to operate 24/7, not just when the wind blows or the sun shines. BWP has a 20-year contract to purchase 13.3% of the project’s capacity and energy, or approximately 2.2 megawatts.

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Intermountain Power,
Utah

The Intermountain Power Project, known as IPP, comprises three different assets: a two-unit 1,900 megawatt coal-fired power plant located in Delta, Utah, a 490-mile 500 kV direct current transmission line called the Southern Transmission System (STS), and two shorter 230 kV and 345 kV alternating current transmission lines called the Northern Transmission System (NTS).  IPP serves a wide variety of publicly owned utilities (36 in all) in Utah and California.  BWP’s share of IPP’s generation capacity is approximately 74 megawatts plus about 108 megawatts (north to south) of capacity on the STS and about 27 megawatts (north to south) of capacity on the NTS. 

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Tieton Hydroelectric,
Washington

The Tieton hydroelectric project is located on the Tieton River near Yakima in eastern Washington. The project is rated at 14 megawatts, generated by twin 7 megawatt hydroelectric turbines.  Hydroelectric plants harness the power of moving water to spin the turbines, these turbines then spin generators, which are used to produce electricity. BWP receives 50% of Tieton’s output and is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the project.

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Hoover Dam,
Arizona

Few power generation facilities are as iconic, or inspire as much awe, as Hoover Dam.  BWP has been a participant in Hoover Dam since the facility’s commissioning in 1936.  Burbank’s share in Hoover Dam is calculated at approximately 20 megawatts.

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Pebble Springs,
Oregon

Pebble Springs is located on the Columbia River west of Portland, Oregon. There are forty-seven wind turbines that produce 98 megawatts of electricity.  Pebble Springs began operations in 2009 and BWP purchases 10 megawatts of Power under an 18 year contract.

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Palo Verde,
Arizona

The Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station is the largest nuclear power plant in the United States with 4,010 megawatts (MW) of generating capacity.  In comparison, that is almost 13 times the size of the Magnolia Power Plant located on the BWP Campus.

 

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Lake One,
Burbank, CA

When most people think of BWP’s local power plants they think of the Magnolia Power Plant which towers
above Magnolia Boulevard or the Olive Plant that has peered over Olive Street since the early 1960s.

 

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